Black Panther Review

The latest Marvel flick to be deemed the “best Marvel movie ever” is none other than the prince (and now king) of Wakanda himself, the Black Panther.

Taking place after the events of Captain America: Civil War, prince T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman) returns to the African nation of Wakanda so that he may rule as the rightful king. However, when a new enemy with royal blood steps forth and threatens world domination, T’Challa’s ability to be the king and Black Panther will be tested. Going to great lengths to maintain the throne and keep his people safe.

Hands down the best aspect of Black Panther was the awe-inspiring aesthetic appeal. The imagery was rich in African heritage and mystique, with a fascinating representation of tradition and tribalism around every corner. It isn’t often you see this kind of African style in film, and it’s worked in very well in Black Panther. Every scene involving some sort of ritual or custom fully engrossed me into the film, more so than I could’ve ever imagined.

Chadwick Boseman as T’Challa (and the Black Panther) was incredibly charismatic without ever trying to do so. His character was so fleshed out and three-dimensional that the audience understood his tribulations and internal conflicts. And these features were only elevated by Boseman’s emotional and memorable performance, which I would put right up there with the other great Marvel actors/actresses.

Unfortunately, all the messages about race and discrimination were so half-baked and paper-thin that I’m confused as to what the fuss is about. It felt to me like a typical Hollywood move, to not even scratch the surface of a serious issue then run around screaming how they’ve helped to change the course of history. There are plenty of films and television shows today diving deeper into topics of race relations than Black Panther ever tread, and in much more clever and insightful ways. This was more like a studio bigwig went through a social justice checklist and less like an earnest, genuine look at complex issues. I’m not blind to the fact that Black Panther is the first of its kind in many unique ways and should be respected as such. But again, I’m frankly surprised that its being heralded as if it were Do the Right Thing, when a lot of the content begs to differ.

When the focus was on Africa, Wakanda, and Boseman, the film thrives in its own unique environment it builds. But when Black Panther remembers it needs to be a superhero movie and mass-appealing blockbuster first, that is when its charm weakens.

Most characters were developed and well-integrated, a few (mostly the villains) were predictable and had muddled motives. Many action scenes were fun and intense, but at the same time completely pointless for the story they were telling (like the obligatory gigantic battle at the climax).

Judging by the overwhelming praise the film has received, I’m currently one of the few not so satisfied moviegoers, even though I sincerely enjoyed many parts of Black Panther. Ultimately for me the weaknesses in the storytelling overtook some of the better aesthetic moments.

The Verdict: C+

-Zachary Flint

2 thoughts on “Black Panther Review

  1. One aspect of the film which I believe is more of a flaw of the character than the movie. Is the fact for the most technologically advanced nation in the world, they form of governance is very primitive. Meaning that in order to be king, you simply have to beat the King in a fistfight. For a country far more advanced than any other country, Michael B Jordan, an outside nearly takes down the country overnight. Even M’Baku almost beats him and becomes King. It’s a flaw in the universe of Black Panther that makes it hard to believe how a Monarchy system can achieve technological advance,emt without involving into a Republic form of governance because that flaw can easily lead to the demise of Wakanda which it almost did.

    Like

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