Doucheaholics Review (2016 Indie Comedy Series)

As so eloquently defined by the Urban Dictionary, a “doucheaholic” is a person suffering from extreme douche-ness. The person who cuts you off in traffic and then proceeds to scream at you. The person who talks badly about you to your friends. The person who brags to no end about countless sexual conquests. All clear-cut signs of douchery.

Now take all these varying douches and put them together in a dysfunctional support group. And here you have the premise of today’s review, a comedy titled Doucheaholics.

Written and directed by Sean McCarthy, this award-winning indie comedy series takes place in a group therapy session humorously titled Doucheaholics Anonymous. Where bad-tempered, poorly mannered men and women go to share their experiences and feel safe from outside judgement.

In Doucheaholics, we meet the many shades and colors of douchery from a diverse group of individuals. Each with a different story to tell about their social misconduct and general aberrant behaviors. What’s interesting about this is how each person, portraying an exaggerated personality type, is rooted in a real behavior we all exhibit in our lives.

Take the character of Laura (Jenn Tripp) for example. A seemingly normal mother struggling to balance her frantic life who, after getting into an altercation with an elderly woman, goes off on a deranged tangent. It’s an exaggerated scenario that we’ve all been through to some degree. For our lives become so hectic and stressful that we can’t help but burst at the seams. The show is just a humorous, slightly satirical take on our real life conundrums.

The show has this absurd level of humor that tests how far you the viewer are willing to suspend your disbelief in the name of comedy. Occasionally Doucheaholics took it pretty far, but not once did it lose me (on account of how much I enjoyed the series). Perhaps my favorite scene displaying the ridiculous nature of Doucheaholics is when the overly promiscuous character known as D-Cup (Ashley Sullivan) sprints down the sidewalk while projectile vomiting into the air. A vile, yet comical display of creativity.

I believe the overarching concept for the show itself is simple and kind of weird, an idea you might cook up with your friends one night whilst joking around. The creators of Doucheaholics took this idea and ran with it, putting an obvious amount of pride and dedication into this project, which payed off in the long run.

Doucheaholics is a delightful romp, with an entertaining cast and self-aware vibe that you only get with a show like this. The parameters for being a douche have never been so well-defined, yet relatable to the average person all the same.

The Verdict: A-

-Zachary Flint

Check out the Doucheaholics website here

Doucheaholics Facebook page

Doucheaholics iTunes page

Avengers: Infinity War Review

It’s the moment everyone has been waiting for. The film that’s been teased and speculated about for what feels like an eternity, Avengers: Infinity War.

The time has come for the Avengers and friends to finally unite against their most formidable foe yet, Thanos (James Brolin). Bent on the cruel idea of random genocide, Thanos must gather the six Infinity Stones (which are basically colorful space rocks) to harness enough power to carry out his plans. With the fate of the galaxy in their hands, the Avengers must set aside their differences in order to stop the forthcoming events. Bringing audiences’ favorite superheroes together in quite unpredictable ways.

Bringing all of Marvel’s current superhero lineup together (minus Ant-man and Hawkeye) is about as exciting as one would imagine. I particularly liked the clashing of personalities between characters like Doctor Strange and Spider-man or Thor and Star-Lord, which makes for some pretty hilarious moments.

At the cost of having all these characters finally together, we get little time committed to each hero. Captain America, Spider-man, Black Panther, all footnotes on a story so large and all-encompassing that it’s surprising we even saw some of these heroes. Yet, If I had to choose a character who steals the spotlight of Avengers: Infinity War, it’d be the antagonist Thanos. For how many characters are shoved into this picture, the audience is given a lot of time devoted to understanding Thanos and his motives. The kind of thing we typically only see with the best of Marvel’s villains.

And for being over two and a half hours long, the film hardly dragged at all. Scenes were usually fast-paced and action-packed, with humorous dialogue and one-liners filling the voids in-between. Other than the occasional lull, Avengers: Infinity War keeps things moving productively and efficiently, even if that means skimping out (or short-cutting) on character development.

I believe those with a love for Marvel are sure to get their money’s worth with Infinity War, especially if you’ve been waiting anxiously for its release for the past few years. The expression of intense emotion ran rampant at my theater; as my viewing was accompanied by shouting, crying, laughing, cheering, the works. Sometimes all at one.

Excitement and Marvel obsessions aside, this is really just your standard sci-fi/adventure film, and I think it should be viewed in proportion to that.

The simple fact that “the show must go on” gives too much obvious insight into the future direction of the series. Without spoiling anything, we unfortunately know exactly what must happen in order to make this franchise continue in a successful manner. That includes reversing events that happen during Infinity War. This all being salient to me while watching the film, it made the emotional scenes slightly less moving.

All the give and take is a small price to pay for such a far-reaching, unprecedented film series.

The Verdict: B-

-Zachary Flint

Super Troopers 2 Review

After almost twenty years since the release of the cult film Super Troopers, audiences decided they needed another dose of their favorite Highway Patrolman. Funded through a very successful Indiegogo campaign, Super Troopers returns for more hijinks, drugs, and ridiculous shenanigans.

Having been fired from the Vermont Highway Patrol for previous mischief, our incompetent heroes are given a shot at redemption when they’re recruited to police a small town along a newly distinguished Canadian-U.S. border. Receiving a not so warm welcome from the Canadian citizens and law enforcement (whom they call the Mounties) alike, the troopers learn that they’re going to have to play hardball with their stubborn, Canuck neighbors. All the while uncovering a smuggling operation using their unconventional policing methods. Starring Jay Chandrasekhar (who also directed the film), Steve Lemme, and Kevin Heffernan, Super Troopers 2 sets out to shock and awe with its carefree humor and frat boy mentality.

The troopers themselves are overall an enjoyable group of guys to watch interact. The actors play the characters well and have an odd charm to them, despite their bizarre behavior. Their immature behavior is frequently so extreme that it’s almost an expression of childlike innocence unfolding onscreen.

The proverbial style of humor used in Super Troopers often felt too off the cuff and unscripted, with many scenes exhausting jokes that weren’t even funny to start. On top of this, the debauchery-filled humor was so effectively distasteful that several people walked out before the halfway point, an impressive exercise in audience alienation.

Yet, maybe therein lies the mass appeal of Super Troopers. People love the randomness of the goofy antics that elicit a mix of laughter and irritation. It doesn’t always have to floor you with clever wit, it just needs to be genuine. And I firmly believe that those involved in Super Troopers 2 are genuinely funny individuals that set out to make a crowd-pleasing sequel.

This doesn’t excuse the numerous attempts at humor that fall flat, which were accompanied by awkward silences in the theater. Nor does it excuse the half-baked plot and villains we’ve seen time and time again. And at the same time, it gave me a newfound appreciation for the audiences who have a knack for this sort of goofball movie. Super Troopers 2 isn’t the highest of brow comedy, but it knows exactly what it is and will surely please its intended audience. An admirable feat that I find it hard to argue with.

The Verdict: C+

-Zachary Flint

A Quiet Place Review

With the simple tagline of, “If they hear you, they hunt you”, actor John Krasinski (The Office) stars in and directs the new hit thriller A Quiet Place.

After some indescribable, extraterrestrial event, Earth becomes ravaged by a race of monstrous creatures with no ability to see but possess supersonic hearing. Those still alive, including the Abbott family (made up of John Krasinski, Emily Blunt, and various child actors), have learned to adopt a nearly silent lifestyle. This involves complex, sand-laden trails, using sign language to communicate (which is to the Abbotts’ benefit since their daughter is already deaf), and even marking spots on hardwood floors that creak the least. In a world where coughing could mean imminent danger, how long can the Abbott’s’ survive?

The way A Quiet Place presents its simple plot and contextual information is a bit passé, and panders to viewers with no concept of subtlety. Rather than showing us how the monsters are deaf and nearly indestructible, the film tells us with overused tropes. Like the overreliance of old newspapers to convey past events. A Quiet Place even resorts to showing the audience a dry-erase board of notes Lee has in his basement, which outlines everything the viewer should know by that point in time. The only way the film would’ve been more on the nose is if John krasinski looked directly at the camera and read the script.

I found this quite strange because everything else in the film was conveyed through the actions of our protagonists, as it should be. Krasinski, Blunt, and all the child actors gave incredibly expressive performances, capturing their struggle of survival very well.

For this reason, moviegoers don’t need spoon-fed exposition, especially when the excellent performances are already communicating everything necessary. Spelling out details you already visually told the audience is needlessly handicapping the storytelling capabilities of your movie, as well as treating me like an idiot.

Other than the first major scare of the film (which introduces the terrifying monsters that will inhabit the rest of the flick), many of the scares were accompanied by the typical Hollywood trope of a loud and obnoxious sound. Frequently used as a lazy tactic to startle rather than scare the audience, even smart horror movies like A Quiet Place fall into the trappings of their inept peers.

There’s one moment that I found particularly frustrating where Evelyn (Emily Blunt’s character) becomes injured in the basement. After alerting her family that she’s in danger, Evelyn limps over to the staircase where she is surprised by the sudden appearance of a monster. This is a perfect setup to frighten the audience. Our complete and undivided focus is on the already injured Evelyn, and not about the possibility of a well-timed scare.

Yet, to my dismay, this scare is accompanied with a loud screeching noise, one that was inessential to the scene. What was supposed to make me fearful and uneasy of the coming moments just angered me instead.

Thankfully the film switches its gears about halfway through, turning into an intense thrill ride full of real tension and horror. No more sudden jumps accompanied with a loud pang of music. We alternatively get tense moments that effectively unsettle and excite the audience, both with strong payoffs.

My few issues with the film aren’t to say that I disliked A Quiet Place, as I found it to be a vastly entertaining and clever modern horror flick, albeit a few self-handicapping aspects that held the film back from being anything more. The most powerful aspect of the film was definitely when the climax hit, where the film turned into a nonstop thriller with great tension in each scene. The performances were all around fantastic, further displaying the acting range (and directing capabilities) of John Krasinski. The central topic (or gimmick, if you will) of A Quiet Place reminds me a lot of the 2016 horror film Don’t Breathe, both of which I believe utilize this concept to the best of their ability.

The Verdict: B

-Zachary Flint

Isle of Dogs Review

After the critical success of his 2009 film Fantastic Mr. Fox, Director Wes Anderson decided to give animation another go with another smashing hit titled Isle of Dogs.

In a (hopefully) distant future, dogs have become the societal scapegoat of Japanese culture. Suffering from overpopulation, dog flu, and numerous other ailments, the Japanese government chooses to exile all dogs in the country to Trash Island. A very literal name for an island formed completely out of garbage.

Here we enter the twelve-year-old orphan Atari Kobayashi (Koyu Rankin), who manages to travel to the island in search of his banished dog Spots (Liev Schreiber). Along his journey Atari meets a gang of dogs on the island, led by a particularly stubborn dog named Chief (Bryan Cranston). As Atari and his new friends attempt to locate Spots, they must avoid capture by the Japanese government, who seeks to end the canine problem once and for all.

Everything about Isle of Dogs is in some way fast-paced. The quippy jokes, bizarre exposition, and hasty story all come shooting at the viewer like lightning, surely catching many by surprise. Even the speed of the animation itself felt like someone backstage hit the fast-forward button before the film began. All the characters move with such immediacy and deliberateness that it captivates the viewer almost automatically.

This is in no way a hindrance to Isle of Dogs and is in part why this film works so well. The quickly dished out jokes give it a distinct, dry sense of humor; and the exposition is rushed simply because there’s so much to get through. Nonetheless, it doesn’t throw you through a hoop and the backstory is actually quite fascinating.

The rapid animation, coupled with Wes Anderson’s unique style and imagery, keeps the story moving in even its slowest points. While Isle of Dogs is mostly stop motion, many of the shots are set up to appear on a two-dimensional plane. And when the camera and characters do slow down, it nicely emphasizes that the scene you’re watching is important. Usually this is done to build the relationship between Atari and Chief and is actually very effective.

So, with that in mind, it isn’t hard to believe that the characters that inhabit Isle of Dogs are incredibly memorable. Each with a unique voice performance from many prominent actors and actresses. A few of the most noticeable voices were Bill Murray, Bryan Cranston, and Edward Norton, who all acted so delightfully you’d have thought they were born to voice a bunch of dogs.

This canine dystopia is, first and foremost, intriguing fun. Telling a heartwarming story about man’s best friend and poking harmless fun at totalitarianism all in the process. The minimal use of music, clever storytelling, and crystal-clear vision of Anderson make for an unforgettable film experience.

I had an exceptionally great time watching Isle of Dogs and will surely return to watch it again.

The Verdict: A

-Zachary Flint

My Neighbor Totoro Review

After my review of Spirited Away back in 2017 (my most popular post to date, mind you), I immediately decided I wanted to review my second favorite Studio Ghibli movie My Neighbor Totoro. An animation studio that, to the extent of my knowledge, never made a bad film. As you can guess, this goal has been postponed, ignored, and procrastinated for a very long time. Finally, after over a year of slowly chipping away at this article, I feel I can competently and properly review this wonderful film.

My Neighbor Totoro follows two young girls named Satsuke and Mei, as they move to the rural countryside of Japan with their father. Together they settle into their home, awaiting their mother who’s ill at the hospital. Satsuke and Mei, full of curiosity, come across a group of good-natured spirits while exploring their new home. Most notable of these spirits is the lovable fan favorite Totoro, a snuggly and plush creature who leisurely roams the nearby forest.

My Neighbor Totoro is the kind of film that you could mute the dialogue and still understand everything occurring on-screen, while also having an enriching experience. The beautiful hand-drawn animation is abundant with warm, welcoming characters and relaxing watercolor skies, lulling the viewer into a sense of contentment. The magic of Ghibli’s animation maintains a well-deserved reputation for being immaculate, and it continues to delight me to this day.

On a purely storytelling level, Ghibli films often just “go with the flow”. There’s no predictable three act structure that audiences groan at because they know precisely what will happen next. We’re merely along for the ride, traveling through a myriad of dream-like sequences of awe-inspiring music and pleasant visuals.

This way of storytelling makes films like Castle in the Sky, Howl’s Moving Castle, and My Neighbor Totoro so memorable. They stand out from the massive amounts of animated white noise that’s pumped out every year.

Years ago, the late film critic Roger Ebert noted how My Neighbor Totoro represents the perfect kind of world to live in. One without villains, conflict, or any sort of antagonist conceivable. Not only do I agree with this sentiment, I think it is key to what makes My Neighbor Totoro such a lovably relatable flick.

It’s an exploration into childlike wonder, taking you back to a simpler time of bliss. No need for bad guys in a peaceful reflection of childhood, only the curiosity and imagination you wish you still had.

My Neighbor Totoro is a family-fun masterpiece of the highest quality. There’s a reason Totoro remains so popular with audiences of all ages, garnering a cult following that only seems to get bigger as time wears on. And if there’s anything that time won’t wear on, it’s Totoro, which I believe will remain timeless and relevant for generations to come.

The Verdict: A

-Zachary Flint

Young Frankenstein Review

During the month of October, I had the incredible experience of viewing Mel Brook’s 1974 comedy classic Young Frankenstein on the big screen. Sitting in an almost completely empty theater, I watched in admiration as one of my favorite actors played out one of his most famous roles, just as people did in 1974.

The story, a comedic spoof based on various film adaptations of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, focuses in on the well-educated medical doctor Dr. Frederick Frankenstein (Gene Wilder). Frederick discovers that he has just inherited the Transylvania castle of his famous grandfather, who conducted experiments in attempts to reanimate the dead. Initially hesitant, Frederick decides to recreate his grandfather’s experiments with the help of an unlikely group of odd individuals.

If there exists a film that is so universally hailed as comedic and undeniably hilarious, then it was probably directed by Mel Brooks. Brooks utilizes every level of humor to its fullest effect, whether it be simple slapstick or a subtler humor that takes a couple of viewings to fully appreciate.

Discussing humor can be a difficult and daunting task, partly because of the subjective nature of comedy. There are only so many ways that I can say a scene from Young Frankenstein is funny, and only so many ways I can say entire films made in its image are not. Yet, with that established, I believe Young Frankenstein to be comedic genius. Brooks takes a beloved source material and handles it with such care, delicacy, and most of all, lunacy.

Pondering such questions as, “What if Igor was in denial that he had a hump?” Or even, “What if Frankenstein’s monster meeting the blind man had a more comedic punch to it?” It’s questions like these that any individual can conjure up in their heads, but only Brooks has the audacity to carry it out on the big screen.

Playing the role of Dr. Frederick Frankenstein, Gene Wilder gives what I would argue the best performance of his career. The frantic ravings and occasional lunacy of a mad scientist in denial about his family heritage is about as outlandish as imaginable, and Wilder fits the bill. Not only that, he becomes the character, going beyond the call of duty to give the audience an unforgettable experience. And is it surprising for me to say that whenever I hear somebody talk about Frankenstein, I first think of this movie, rather than the Universal classic?

One can hardly forget the enigmatic supporting cast, who help make this lovely masterpiece what we know it as today. My personal favorite would be Igor (Marty Feldman), a dimwitted wisecracker with a knack for making the situation worse. Something about Igor has always appealed to me unlike anyone else in the film. His onscreen presence alone is enough to elicit hysterical laughter from yours truly.

Young Frankenstein is a film I re-explore at least once a year, typically around the Halloween season, and for good reason. It’s listed as one of the greatest comedies of all time by the American Film Institute (14th), Bravo TV (56th), Rolling Stone (5th), and was even selected for the Library of Congress National Film Registry. It’s a beloved masterpiece that will hopefully be respected by moviegoers for years to come.

The Verdict: A

-Zachary Flint