Doucheaholics Review (2016 Indie Comedy Series)

As so eloquently defined by the Urban Dictionary, a “doucheaholic” is a person suffering from extreme douche-ness. The person who cuts you off in traffic and then proceeds to scream at you. The person who talks badly about you to your friends. The person who brags to no end about countless sexual conquests. All clear-cut signs of douchery.

Now take all these varying douches and put them together in a dysfunctional support group. And here you have the premise of today’s review, a comedy titled Doucheaholics.

Written and directed by Sean McCarthy, this award-winning indie comedy series takes place in a group therapy session humorously titled Doucheaholics Anonymous. Where bad-tempered, poorly mannered men and women go to share their experiences and feel safe from outside judgement.

In Doucheaholics, we meet the many shades and colors of douchery from a diverse group of individuals. Each with a different story to tell about their social misconduct and general aberrant behaviors. What’s interesting about this is how each person, portraying an exaggerated personality type, is rooted in a real behavior we all exhibit in our lives.

Take the character of Laura (Jenn Tripp) for example. A seemingly normal mother struggling to balance her frantic life who, after getting into an altercation with an elderly woman, goes off on a deranged tangent. It’s an exaggerated scenario that we’ve all been through to some degree. For our lives become so hectic and stressful that we can’t help but burst at the seams. The show is just a humorous, slightly satirical take on our real life conundrums.

The show has this absurd level of humor that tests how far you the viewer are willing to suspend your disbelief in the name of comedy. Occasionally Doucheaholics took it pretty far, but not once did it lose me (on account of how much I enjoyed the series). Perhaps my favorite scene displaying the ridiculous nature of Doucheaholics is when the overly promiscuous character known as D-Cup (Ashley Sullivan) sprints down the sidewalk while projectile vomiting into the air. A vile, yet comical display of creativity.

I believe the overarching concept for the show itself is simple and kind of weird, an idea you might cook up with your friends one night whilst joking around. The creators of Doucheaholics took this idea and ran with it, putting an obvious amount of pride and dedication into this project, which payed off in the long run.

Doucheaholics is a delightful romp, with an entertaining cast and self-aware vibe that you only get with a show like this. The parameters for being a douche have never been so well-defined, yet relatable to the average person all the same.

The Verdict: A-

-Zachary Flint

Check out the Doucheaholics website here

Doucheaholics Facebook page

Doucheaholics iTunes page

Young Frankenstein Review

During the month of October, I had the incredible experience of viewing Mel Brook’s 1974 comedy classic Young Frankenstein on the big screen. Sitting in an almost completely empty theater, I watched in admiration as one of my favorite actors played out one of his most famous roles, just as people did in 1974.

The story, a comedic spoof based on various film adaptations of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, focuses in on the well-educated medical doctor Dr. Frederick Frankenstein (Gene Wilder). Frederick discovers that he has just inherited the Transylvania castle of his famous grandfather, who conducted experiments in attempts to reanimate the dead. Initially hesitant, Frederick decides to recreate his grandfather’s experiments with the help of an unlikely group of odd individuals.

If there exists a film that is so universally hailed as comedic and undeniably hilarious, then it was probably directed by Mel Brooks. Brooks utilizes every level of humor to its fullest effect, whether it be simple slapstick or a subtler humor that takes a couple of viewings to fully appreciate.

Discussing humor can be a difficult and daunting task, partly because of the subjective nature of comedy. There are only so many ways that I can say a scene from Young Frankenstein is funny, and only so many ways I can say entire films made in its image are not. Yet, with that established, I believe Young Frankenstein to be comedic genius. Brooks takes a beloved source material and handles it with such care, delicacy, and most of all, lunacy.

Pondering such questions as, “What if Igor was in denial that he had a hump?” Or even, “What if Frankenstein’s monster meeting the blind man had a more comedic punch to it?” It’s questions like these that any individual can conjure up in their heads, but only Brooks has the audacity to carry it out on the big screen.

Playing the role of Dr. Frederick Frankenstein, Gene Wilder gives what I would argue the best performance of his career. The frantic ravings and occasional lunacy of a mad scientist in denial about his family heritage is about as outlandish as imaginable, and Wilder fits the bill. Not only that, he becomes the character, going beyond the call of duty to give the audience an unforgettable experience. And is it surprising for me to say that whenever I hear somebody talk about Frankenstein, I first think of this movie, rather than the Universal classic?

One can hardly forget the enigmatic supporting cast, who help make this lovely masterpiece what we know it as today. My personal favorite would be Igor (Marty Feldman), a dimwitted wisecracker with a knack for making the situation worse. Something about Igor has always appealed to me unlike anyone else in the film. His onscreen presence alone is enough to elicit hysterical laughter from yours truly.

Young Frankenstein is a film I re-explore at least once a year, typically around the Halloween season, and for good reason. It’s listed as one of the greatest comedies of all time by the American Film Institute (14th), Bravo TV (56th), Rolling Stone (5th), and was even selected for the Library of Congress National Film Registry. It’s a beloved masterpiece that will hopefully be respected by moviegoers for years to come.

The Verdict: A

-Zachary Flint

 

Game Night Review

A film like Game Night lives for the absurd and unexpected. Pushing the audience to the limits of plausibility, yet somehow avoiding jumping the shark in the process. It does its best to show the audience a good time, all while throwing in laugh out loud plot twists and a variety of comedy styles (including deadpan, dark, situational, and even occasional gross-out comedy).

Game Night focuses on the characters of Max (Jason Bateman) and Annie (Rachel McAdams), who are as competitive as individuals could possibly get. Frequently dominating the game nights they host for their friend group, Max and Annie are surprised when Max’s overachieving brother Brooks (Kyle Chandler) comes to visit. Brooks decides to give hosting a try and sets up a murder mystery party with fake criminals and FBI agents. However, as the game wears on and its participants compete to solve the mystery, they all discover that it’s not a game at all, and that their lives are in real danger. Leading to one wild chain of events and worst possible outcomes imaginable.

The film quickly proved to be more comedically intelligent than I would’ve anticipated, as jokes set up early on as one-offs would turn out to be well-crafted, long-running gags that span the length of the movie, and they all work. Occasionally a bit will be off the mark or badly timed, but the film moves so fast that there really isn’t time to fixate on the poor slices of humor.

The ceaseless bickering of our two leads is carried out with such finesse, such authenticity, that I found their performances particularly noteworthy for that very reason. They fire back and forth at one another in this passive-aggressive tone that really worked given the actors and scenarios. In one scene, after Jason Bateman is shot in the forearm, Rachel McAdams is forced to perform an impromptu surgery on him in a back alley. What ensues is so ridiculous, gross, and perfectly timed that I wouldn’t dare ruin it here.

And while the cast plays off the circumstances of the story quite wonderfully, the true star of Game Night is indeed the plot, which was so far-fetched that I certainly had no idea where it would go next. Often films try to immerse the moviegoer into the experience, as if they were part of the movie. Here, the moviegoer is more an innocent bystander watching the madness unfold, all to our sick sadistic pleasure.

I enjoyed Game Night in all its twists, turns, and various comedic ventures. I was constantly kept on my toes awaiting the next set of crazy plot twists or weird attempt at humor. Game Night was a much more exciting and all-around better film than I would’ve ever expected, and I can’t really argue with that.

The Verdict: B

-Zachary Flint

Peter Rabbit Review

When I heard Sony was making a live-action/CGI animated film of Peter Rabbit (based on the stories by Beatrix Potter), my mind immediately went to Sony Animation’s The Smurfs. A film so dull and manipulative that it practically invented the term “corporate pandering”, I was sure Peter Rabbit would suffer the same fate.

Luckily, in some ways I was wrong. Meaning that Peter Rabbit had some redeeming qualities, which are sadly overshadowed by an overall lackluster picture.

Peter Rabbit stars the adorable rabbit himself Peter (voiced by James Corden), who loves sneaking into Mr. McGregor’s (Sam Neill) vegetable garden. After Mr. McGregor’s sudden passing, his home is left to one of his distant relatives named Thomas (Domhnall Gleeson), who plans to sell the house and make a pretty penny in the process. When Thomas discovers the rabbits intruding on his newly acquired property, he decides to take “pest” control into his own hands as an epic battle ensues between the two rivaling parties: man vs. rabbits.

The most insufferable part of Peter Rabbit was of course Peter Rabbit himself, along with the rest of his CGI entourage. All the humor and high jinks surrounding their characters have been done to death, and subsequently they get very few laughs. Most jokes went on for a painful amount of time, and sometimes I had to stop watching altogether (especially when the rabbits just kept talking).

The funniest moments were the oddly dark scenes, like when Mr. McGregor has a heart attack and dies out of nowhere. Not only are the animals overjoyed by his death, they celebrate by partying and trashing his house. While I found these scenes to be rather hilarious, when taking into account the target audience of Peter Rabbit (that being young children) it’s distastefully out of place.

The messages and morals are so on the nose that it treats kids as if they haven’t the least bit of intelligence. And because these messages are so at odds with the story and the characters’ behaviors, Peter Rabbit ends up being a pretty pointless endeavor. The film gives the vague appearance that Peter and Thomas learn something at the end, but their characters make no real change. In fact, both characters seemingly learned these lessons at multiple points in the movie yet resort back to their immature selves just moments later.

As far as creative, funny content goes, Peter Rabbit has more to offer adults in the first thirty minutes than it does kids for the whole movie. Still, this isn’t to say adults will like this, as the vast majority is quite boring. Storywise, this is your typical half-hearted family comedy. Some attempts at real jokes and emotional moments are made, other times it all feels dull, disingenuous, and too cynical. Domhnall Gleeson gives his very best performance, and a lot of times his talent for acting works past the mediocrities, rising to levels of complete insanity. Other than that, everyone (including our furry stars) is bland and uninteresting. And seeing that Paddington 2 came out just a few months prior, there really is no excuse for such a boring story and bland personalities.

My disdain for a product like Peter Rabbit may sound trivial, but I strongly feel that movies should treat children with more respect. Attempting to inspire and challenge kids, as well as make them use their brains. Movies shouldn’t manipulate kids and subject them to apathetic corporate hullabaloo.

The Verdict: D+

-Zachary Flint

Daddy’s Home 2: A Ho Ho Horrible Holiday ‘Comedy’

Daddys Home 2 follows the occasionally used formula of turning a comedy sequel into a holiday escapade. An almost always disastrous decision (just look at A Bad Moms Christmas), it will surprise no one to hear that Daddy’s Home 2 is a comedic flop. With the first Daddy’s Home being a mediocre and forgettable comedy, this installment had no intentions whatsoever in surpassing it.

Will Ferrell plays his usual man-child schtick, and Mark Wahlberg plays a tough guy. Together they co-parent a set of forgettable child actors, who are disappointed they always must do two Christmases. That’s when Ferrell and Wahlberg get the bright idea to do a joint Christmas, as well as invite both of their dads in on the excitement. Their dads unfortunately consist of Mel Gibson (a stereotypical racist) and John Lithgow (a mirror image of Will Ferrell). From here, wacky and predictable hijinks ensue.

The only clever bit in the film involved a below the belt jab at Liam Neeson and his typical style of movies. Apparently in this universe, Neeson starred in a terribly bloated action film called Missile Tow (Get it!). From my guess, this is some kind of holiday version of Taken or Non-Stop. Pretty humorous nonetheless.

Daddy’s Home 2 suffers from the same ailment as every other bad comedy. That being, it’s not funny. It’s constantly caught between trying way too hard to be comedic and not trying at all. Sometimes there are moments of slapstick humor that are painfully long, and at other times there are scenes where I’m waiting for a punchline that never comes.

And by the end of Daddy’s Home 2, few of the characters went through any sort of change or revelation. They’re all still horrible people, yet the film accepts this and just decides to end on a poor note. Nothing is gained from watching it. In fact, all Daddy’s Home 2 really did was shine a spotlight on the limitations of these actors and actresses.

There was one particular scene in the film that really rubbed me the wrong way, and I think it really captures the mentality of Daddy’s Home 2. It’s when the entire cast gathers at a movie theater towards the conclusion of the movie. Will Ferrell’s character stands up in front of a crowd and makes a comment on how everyone came to the theater with someone they love. Except, of course, one man in the back, who came to the movie alone on Christmas. Will Ferrell then makes a passing remark on how this man is sad, and somewhat pathetic.

Well, movie, Christmas for some isn’t so joyful, and is quite lonely and depressing. So, when you make a shoddy, low-quality, unfunny, sloppy joke such as that, you come off as a huge dick.

Bottom line, this movie sucks.

The Verdict: F

-Zachary Flint

The LEGO Ninjago Movie Review

It was obvious from the get-go that The LEGO Ninjago Movie would be the least inspired installment of the continuing LEGO Movie franchise. Based loosely off a children’s cartoon series (which in turn was based off a preexisting toyline), The LEGO Ninjago Movie tells the story of Lloyd Garmadon (Dave Franco), who lives in a metropolitan city constantly threatened by the evil Lord Garmadon (Justin Theroux). Lloyd happens to be the most despised individual in the entire city, mostly because of his relation to Lord Garmadon.

Luckily, Garmadon never comes close to ruling over anything, because the LEGO city is protected by a secretive ninja force led by Master Wu (Jackie Chan). And, unbeknownst to just about everyone, Lloyd happens to be one of those very ninjas. He, along with the rest of his ninja friends, is about to embark on a dangerous quest to stop Lord Garmadon for good.

The LEGO Ninjago Movie features many bizarre creative choices that I found to be quite delightful. The tone and the genre of the film, for example, are ever-changing and seem to be a blend of many ideas.

This film should’ve come with a hyperactivity warning, as there are very few breathers for the audience. Not only are the scene transitions quick, but entire plot points fly by at a rapid pace. What felt like five minutes of watching LEGO Ninjago turned out to be an hours’ worth of the film.

Sadly, most of the characters didn’t have any depth or personality to them. Other than the lead antagonist Garmadon and Master Wu, none really stood out as being interesting. I noticed multiple talented voice actors behind the little brick figures, but I guess the script didn’t call for utilizing their full potential.

Probably the best aspect of the film was the clever humor poking fun at popular action/adventure genre tropes. In one scene, they mock the overuse of the popular sound effect dubbed the Wilhelm Scream (heard in Star Wars as well as Indiana Jones). In another hilarious scene, they comment on how the wise character in action/adventure movies always withhold incredibly important knowledge until they’re in the process of dying. Very funny.

The LEGO Ninjago Movie had plenty of comedic, fun-filled moments, yet unfortunately lacked the charm of its LEGO predecessors. There are a plethora of scenes attempting to teach kids very simple and valuable messages. But where these scenes came off as cute in LEGO Batman and The LEGO Movie, here they’re just sappy. Those looking for a fast-paced children’s comedy won’t need to search any further. However, if you were expecting anything more than that, you may find yourself disappointed.

The Verdict: B-

-Zachary Flint

The House (2017) Review

If you’ve ever wondered how a film could perfectly squander the acting talents of two A-list movie stars, then look no further than The House.

The House stars Will Ferrell and Amy Poehler as Scott and Kate, two parents trying to send their daughter Alex (Ryan Simpkins) to college. With very little money to do so, Scott and Kate reluctantly decide to open up an illegal casino in the basement of their good friend Frank’s (Jason Mantzoukas) house. As they quickly become absorbed into the Vegas-esque lifestyle, Scott and Kate soon realize the bit off way more than they can chew, with angry councilmen, dim-witted cops, and even gangsters hot on their trail.

The most unfortunate aspect of The House isn’t its poorly paced plot or the abundance of shoddy scenes that go nowhere. No, the worst part of this entire picture happened to be the shockingly lousy performances of Will Ferrell and Amy Poehler, who were given too much free rein in their acting. It was as if they were both put in front of a camera and told to “be funny”. This decision to use improvisation resulted in horrible comedic timing, with many awkward pauses that constantly broke up the dialogue.

The one saving grace of The House that rescues it from being a complete failure in comedy, is the arrival of Jeremy Renner’s character. Renner played a mob boss whose behavior matched the nonsensical tone of the film much better than anyone else. The few scenes Renner was involved with are downright over-the-top and ridiculous, which actually got some laughs from the audience. Even though his presence in the film was short-lived, his character was infinitely more entertaining than Ferrell or Poehler.

The House could’ve been a much more successful comedy, had it only embraced the absurd nature of the premise (and stuck to a more focused plot). The moments where Will Ferrell is chopping off fingers and Jeremy Renner is getting set on fire are hilarious, but make up only a small sliver of the film. Most of the time the audience is subjected to embarrassingly stale humor from actors that deserve a better vessel to showcase their talents.

With overwhelmingly bad direction, crummy plot pacing, and lots of wasted potential, The House is a film that audiences will be quick to forget.

The Verdict: D

-Zachary Flint