Doucheaholics Review (2016 Indie Comedy Series)

As so eloquently defined by the Urban Dictionary, a “doucheaholic” is a person suffering from extreme douche-ness. The person who cuts you off in traffic and then proceeds to scream at you. The person who talks badly about you to your friends. The person who brags to no end about countless sexual conquests. All clear-cut signs of douchery.

Now take all these varying douches and put them together in a dysfunctional support group. And here you have the premise of today’s review, a comedy titled Doucheaholics.

Written and directed by Sean McCarthy, this award-winning indie comedy series takes place in a group therapy session humorously titled Doucheaholics Anonymous. Where bad-tempered, poorly mannered men and women go to share their experiences and feel safe from outside judgement.

In Doucheaholics, we meet the many shades and colors of douchery from a diverse group of individuals. Each with a different story to tell about their social misconduct and general aberrant behaviors. What’s interesting about this is how each person, portraying an exaggerated personality type, is rooted in a real behavior we all exhibit in our lives.

Take the character of Laura (Jenn Tripp) for example. A seemingly normal mother struggling to balance her frantic life who, after getting into an altercation with an elderly woman, goes off on a deranged tangent. It’s an exaggerated scenario that we’ve all been through to some degree. For our lives become so hectic and stressful that we can’t help but burst at the seams. The show is just a humorous, slightly satirical take on our real life conundrums.

The show has this absurd level of humor that tests how far you the viewer are willing to suspend your disbelief in the name of comedy. Occasionally Doucheaholics took it pretty far, but not once did it lose me (on account of how much I enjoyed the series). Perhaps my favorite scene displaying the ridiculous nature of Doucheaholics is when the overly promiscuous character known as D-Cup (Ashley Sullivan) sprints down the sidewalk while projectile vomiting into the air. A vile, yet comical display of creativity.

I believe the overarching concept for the show itself is simple and kind of weird, an idea you might cook up with your friends one night whilst joking around. The creators of Doucheaholics took this idea and ran with it, putting an obvious amount of pride and dedication into this project, which payed off in the long run.

Doucheaholics is a delightful romp, with an entertaining cast and self-aware vibe that you only get with a show like this. The parameters for being a douche have never been so well-defined, yet relatable to the average person all the same.

The Verdict: A-

-Zachary Flint

Check out the Doucheaholics website here

Doucheaholics Facebook page

Doucheaholics iTunes page

Inside Job Review (2016 Short Film)

Today I’ve been asked to review the 2016 independent film titled Inside Job.

Inside Job is a dark comedy about an intern named Josh, who is recruited to work for an obscure company led by Mr. G (played by writer and director Matt Nagin). Mr. G is the epitome of a scumbag employer, who takes advantage of women, frequently uses drugs, and is feared by all his employees. The intern is about to get an experience of a lifetime, as his new boss may have something secretly in store for him.

The frequent antics of Mr. G are quite absurd and, at times, very humorous. His drug use is darkly comedic, and his outlandish belief that a rubber chicken is actually his wife makes me laugh from just how off the wall it is. Unfortunately, somewhere down the line, Inside Job went from “dark comedy” to just plain dark.

I believe the overall message that the film tried to communicate got lost in translation. The motivations of the characters were somewhat backwards and confusing, with an ending that didn’t feel fully developed.

 

The greatest moments of Inside Job are the more physical bits of comedy, that aren’t quite as bombastic as the dialogue. The mannerisms and actions of Mr. G are delightful to watch, as his character really does steal the show in the best way.

So while I think the end takes too many twists in turns in its final act, Inside Job is worth watching for those into independent films with wacky concepts.

The Verdict: C+

-Zachary Flint

The Story of 90 Coins Review (Short Film)

“Don’t let a promise become just a beautiful memory”, a poignant message from the Chinese short film The Story of 90 Coins. The directorial debut of Malaysian filmmaker Michael Wong, The Story of 90 Coins is quick with its pacing, and poetic with its words.

The film stars Han Dongjun and Zhuang Zhiqi as two young lovers in the modern world. The man makes a promise of never-ending love to the woman, love that he expresses over a period of ninety days. While all goes well in the beginning (with honest intentions of marriage in the future), reality sets in for our female lead, who chooses to follow her career aspirations over her partner.

Being just below ten minutes long, the audience isn’t given much time to grow attached to these characters. The film knows this, and does incredibly well at giving us the necessary details and personality traits of the characters so that we can feel invested in their relationship.

One slight issue the film comes across is that, while the characters are likable and work well together onscreen, the film’s pacing is somewhat off. Certain scenes or moments that should’ve gotten more attention are grazed over, while some scenes of lesser importance got more focus onscreen. Again, being restricted to only ten minutes in runtime, this is only a minute detail that is easily forgivable.

I have a particular admiration for films that give viewers an unconventional ending, especially when you’re expecting something far different than what you get. The Story of 90 Coins is one of those films. Instead of leaving the audience off on a romanticized and sentimental note, the film promptly shows us the realities of love, loss, and regret. And in the end, the audience is left with some wise words of caution, being not to break promises we may later regret. A simple, yet touching message.

The synthesized soundtrack that accompanies most of the film is definitely overemphasized, acting more as a hindrance than building any sort of drama. I feel that the film could’ve been even more emotional and effective, had it not been for the distracting music attempting to be dramatic.

The Story of 90 Coins is a short little drama that I found to have a high entertainment value. While the pacing and soundtrack aren’t utilized to their best potential, the true strengths of The Story of 90 Coins lie in the genuine acting and the powerfully woven message.

Check out The Story of 90 Coins here!

The Verdict: B

-Zachary Flint