The Rocketeer Review: A Forgotten Disney Classic

Hearkening back to action/adventure serials of the 1940s and 50s (like Flash Gordon), The Rocketeer stars Billy Campbell as Cliff Secord, an overconfident pilot in love with a stunning actress Jenny Blake (Jennifer Connelly). When Cliff discovers a hidden jet pack that was stolen from the U.S. government, he puts on the rocket, creates a makeshift helmet, and becomes the hero known as The Rocketeer. But when the criminals who initially stole the jet pack catch wind of this hero, they attempt to retake possession of the jet pack and use it for evil. Cliff must now assume the role as this masked hero to save the day, and his girl.

I love The Rocketeer in the same way I like Raiders of the Lost Ark or Star Wars. It’s simple action/adventure movie fun. A straightforward story with traditional characters and themes from a much simpler time, all leading up to an exciting, action-packed conclusion.

Our main protagonist Cliff Secord is the dashing everyman, as in every man would want to be him. Really, that’s the entire appeal to his character. The personality of Cliff is almost nonexistent and is more just an afterthought, but that’s okay as he serves his role in the story well. He’s charming, heroic, and willing to risk his own life to save those closest. And best of all, Jennifer Connelly is his girlfriend, a major plus.

The charming and devious Neville Sinclair (played by Timothy Dalton) is as evil as his name sounds. Dastardly villainous in every way, Sinclair turns out not to be a greedy businessman, but a Nazi secret agent. Can there be a worse evil? Well, Sinclair stands as the perfect antagonist for our heroic Rocketeer, who dukes it out with Sinclair and his cronies in a finale of epic proportions.

I enjoyed The Rocketeer in its entirety, and I wish more films could embrace the same simplicity that it operates on (while also putting in the same amount of attention and care). The Rocketeer never really got the affection it so rightfully deserved, and as far as Disney flicks go, this is long gone and forgotten. Audiences shrugged, critics shrugged, and everyone eventually forgot all about The Rocketeer.

I’ve heard news about a potential remake of the film by Disney, which would fortunately bring attention back to this wonderful, forgotten flick. At the same time, I fear Disney would lose sight in what made The Rocketeer a good film in the first place, attempting to force too much crowd pandering messages/themes into what should be a simple, cut and dry story. Just as a remake of something like Alice in Wonderland can’t tarnish the image of the Disney animated classic, a poor remake of The Rocketeer would only help to remind people of why the original was so good in the first place.

The Verdict: A

-Zachary Flint